Toronto Street Post Office

Toronto Street Post Office, const. 1853

Toronto Street Post Office, const. 1853

The stately Toronto Street Post Office is one of Toronto’s most illustrious buildings.   A small building with a big story, this iconic property began life in 1853 as Toronto’s Seventh Post Office, but came to be occupied in 1959 by Argus Corp and subsequently in 1979 by Hollinger International.   Indeed it was here that Conrad Black fought his final shareholder battle in 2003, before facing fraud charges in the US.   Prior to it’s service to Canadian business the building had been firmly in the public domain – previous occupants were The Bank of Canada, Revenue Canada and, of course, the Post Office.  Constructed in the Greek Revival Style the building is a very handsome structure, and makes an excellent architectural contribution to downtown Toronto.  The architect was Cumberland and Ridout, who also designed the nearby Cathedral Church of St. James and the Adelaide Court House.  The building was designated as a National Historic Site of Canada in 1958. Nowadays 10 Toronto Street is occupied by respected investment managers Morgan, Meighen & Associates, who completed an extensive restoration in 2006. Typically Toronto Street is littered with parked cars and I was very surprised (and delighted!) when I finally found the building unobstructed and was able to grab this shot.  The light wasn’t ideal, but a building of this quality shines in all conditions.